What is Civil Engineering?


Civil engineering is arguably the oldest engineering discipline. It deals with the built environment and can be dated to the first time someone placed a roof over his or her head or laid a tree trunk across a river to make it easier to get across.

The built environment encompasses much of what defines modern civilization. Buildings and bridges are often the first constructions that come to mind, as they are the most conspicuous creations of structural engineering, one of civil engineering’s major sub-disciplines. Roads, railroads, subway systems, and airports are designed by transportation engineers, another category of civil engineering. And then there are the less visible creations of civil engineers. Every time you open a water faucet, you expect water to come out, without thinking that civil engineers made it possible. New York City has one of the world’s most impressive water supply systems, receiving billions of gallons of high-quality water from the Catskills over one hundred miles away. Similarly, not many people seem to worry about what happens to the water after it has served its purposes. The old civil engineering discipline of sanitary engineering has evolved into modern environmental engineering of such significance that most academic departments have changed their names to civil and environmental engineering.

These few examples illustrate that civil engineers do a lot more than design buildings and bridges. They can be found in the aerospace industry, designing jetliners and space stations; in the automotive industry, perfecting the load-carrying capacity of a chassis and improving the crashworthiness of bumpers and doors; and they can be found in the ship building industry, the power industry, and many other industries wherever constructed facilities are involved. And they plan and oversee the construction of these facilities as construction managers.

Civil engineering is an exciting profession because at the end of the day you can see the results of your work, whether this is a completed bridge, a high-rise building, a subway station, or a hydroelectric dam.

Please look at the Web pages of our individual faculty members to learn more about their special interests as examples of what civil engineering and engineering mechanics is and can be about.

What is Instrumentation Engineering?


In scientific terms, instrumentation is defined as the art and science of measurement and control of process variables within a production, or manufacturing area. The science has further opened up the realm of instrumentation engineering.

The discipline of instrumentation engineering branched out of the streams of electrical and electronic engineering some time in the early part of 1970s. “It is a multi-disciplinary stream and covers subjects from various branches such as chemical, mechanical, electrical, electronics and computers,” says Prof. A. Bhujanga Rao, from the department of Instrumentation Engineering, Andhra University.

The professor adds that instrumentation engineering is a specialised branch of electrical and electronic engineering and it deals with measurement, control and automation of processes.

SCOPE

Almost all process and manufacturing industry such as steel, oil, petrochemical, power and defence production will have a separate instrumentation department, which is manned and managed by instrumentation engineers. “Automation is the buzz word in process industry, and automation is the core job of instrumentation engineers. Hence, the demand for instrumentation will always be there,” says the professor.

The growth in the avionics, aeronautical and space science sectors has also increased the scope for instrumentation engineers. Instrumentation engineers can also fit in both software and hardware sectors.

Apart from covering core subjects such as system dynamics, industrial instrumentation and process control, analytical and bio-medical instrumentation and robotics, the students deal with software and hardware topics such as microprocessor and micro controller based instrumentation, VLSI and embedded system designs, computer architecture and organisation and computer control of processes. Computer languages such as ‘C’ and Fortran are also part of the curriculum. This makes an instrumentation engineer fit for both the hardware and the software industry. Moreover, since instrumentation engineers are presumed to be good in physics, the logical ability is expected to be on the higher side, which is a basic quality needed to excel in the software industry.

The demand is so high that every student finds at least two jobs waiting in the wings, by the time he or she completes her course, says Dr. Bhujanga Rao.

Nature of work of an instrumentation engineer ranges from designing, developing, installing, managing equipments that are used to monitor and control machinery and processes.

“Though there is a demand for instrumentation engineers from the software sector, we prefer the core area, as that is where we can showcase our creativity and knowledge,” says Srinivas a third-year student.

The shift towards core sector is not only due to the opportunity to showcase ones creative talent and knowledge, but also because of the long term stability and quick growth. Bio-medical is another area that is fast catching up and there is huge requirement for instrumentation professionals.

Instrumentation engineering that made its way as an exclusive engineering discipline in the early part of 1970s was earlier known as M.Sc. Tech Instrumentation in many of the colleges. It was then a three-year PG course. Even today, it is referred to by different names by various colleges. While some call it as B. Tech- electronics and instrumentation, a few name it as B. Tech – control and instrumentation. Whatever, be the name, the curriculum is the same.

What is Electrical Engineering?


Electrical engineering is one of the newer branches of engineering, and dates back to the late 19th century. It is the branch of engineering that deals with the technology of electricity. Electrical engineers work on a wide range of components, devices and systems, from tiny microchips to huge power station generators.

Early experiments with electricity included primitive batteries and static charges. However, the actual design, construction and manufacturing of useful devices and systems began with the implementation of Michael Faraday’s Law of Induction, which essentially states that the voltage in a circuit is proportional to the rate of change in the magnetic field through the circuit. This law applies to the basic principles of the electric generator, the electric motor and the transformer. The advent of the modern age is marked by the introduction of electricity to homes, businesses and industry, all of which were made possible by electrical engineers.

Some of the most prominent pioneers in electrical engineering includeThomas Edison (electric light bulb), George Westinghouse (alternating current), Nikola Tesla (induction motor), Guglielmo Marconi (radio) andPhilo T. Farnsworth (television). These innovators turned ideas and concepts about electricity into practical devices and systems that ushered in the modern age.

Since its early beginnings, the field of electrical engineering has grown and branched out into a number of specialized categories, including power generation and transmission systems, motors, batteries and control systems. Electrical engineering also includes electronics, which has itself branched into an even greater number of subcategories, such as radio frequency (RF) systems, telecommunications, remote sensing, signal processing, digital circuits, instrumentation, audio, video and optoelectronics.

The field of electronics was born with the invention of the thermionic valve diode vacuum tube in 1904 by John Ambrose Fleming. The vacuum tube basically acts as a current amplifier by outputting a multiple of its input current. It was the foundation of all electronics, including radios, television and radar, until the mid-20th century. It was largely supplanted by the transistor, which was developed in 1947 at AT&T’s Bell Laboratories by William Shockley, John Bardeen and Walter Brattain, for which they received the 1956 Nobel Prize in physics.

What is Mechanical Engineering?


Mechanical engineering is a diverse subject that derives its breadth from the need to design and manufacture everything from small individual parts and devices (e.g., microscale sensors and inkjet printer nozzles) to large systems (e.g., spacecraft and machine tools). The role of a mechanical engineer is to take a product from an idea to the marketplace. In order to accomplish this, a broad range of skills are needed. The mechanical engineer needs to acquire particular skills and knowledge. He/she needs to understand the forces and the thermal environment that a product, its parts, or its subsystems will encounter; to design them for functionality, aesthetics, and the ability to withstand the forces and the thermal environment they will be subjected to; and to determine the best way to manufacture them and ensure they will operate without failure. Perhaps the one skill that is the mechanical engineer’s exclusive domain is the ability to analyze and design objects and systems with motion.

Since these skills are required for virtually everything that is made, mechanical engineering is perhaps the broadest and most diverse of engineering disciplines. Mechanical engineers play a central role in such industries as automotive (from the car chassis to its every subsystem—engine, transmission, sensors); aerospace (airplanes, aircraft engines, control systems for airplanes and spacecraft); biotechnology (implants, prosthetic devices, fluidic systems for pharmaceutical industries); computers and electronics (disk drives, printers, cooling systems, semiconductor tools); microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS (sensors, actuators, micropower generation); energy conversion (gas turbines, wind turbines, solar energy, fuel cells); environmental control (HVAC, air-conditioning, refrigeration, compressors); automation (robots, data and image acquisition, recognition, control); manufacturing (machining, machine tools, prototyping, microfabrication).

To put it simply, mechanical engineering deals with anything that moves, including the human body, a very complex machine. Mechanical engineers learn about materials, solid and fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, control, instrumentation, design, and manufacturing to understand mechanical systems. Specialized mechanical engineering subjects include biomechanics, cartilage-tissue engineering, energy conversion, laser-assisted materials processing, combustion, MEMS, microfluidic devices, fracture mechanics, nanomechanics, mechanisms, micropower generation, tribology (friction and wear), and vibrations. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) currently lists 36 technical divisions, from advanced energy systems and aerospace engineering to solid-waste engineering and textile engineering.

The breadth of the mechanical engineering discipline allows students a variety of career options beyond some of the industries listed above. Regardless of the particular path they envision for themselves after they graduate, their education will have provided them with the creative thinking that allows them to design an exciting product or system, the analytical tools to achieve their design goals, the ability to overcome all constraints, and the teamwork needed to design, market, and produce a system. These valuable skills could also launch a career in medicine, law, consulting, management, banking, finance, and so on.

For those interested in applied scientific and mathematical aspects of the discipline, graduate study in mechanical engineering can lead to a career of research and teaching.

Twenty20 World Cup Schedule 2016


The ICC World Twenty20 2016 is a 20/20 cricket tournament will be played in India in March-April 2016. ICC T20 World Cup 2016 will be the 6th ICC World Twenty20 tournament and is scheduled from 15 March to 3 April. Sri Lanka are the defending champions.

First round (group winners to progress to second round)
Group A Bangladesh, Netherlands, Ireland and Oman
Group B Zimbabwe, Scotland, Hong Kong and Afghanistan

Second round Super 10 Groups
Group 1 Sri Lanka, South Africa, West Indies, England and winner group B (Q1B)
Group 2 India, Pakistan, Australia, New Zealand and winner group A (Q1A)
2016 ICC World Twenty20

19 10 7
Date & time Detail
Mar-2016
Tue 08 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 1st Match, First Round Group B – Hong Kong vs Zimbabwe
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Tue 08 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 2nd Match, First Round Group B – Afghanistan vs Scotland
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Wed 09 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 3rd Match, First Round Group A – Bangladesh vs Netherlands
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Wed 09 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 4th Match, First Round Group A – Ireland vs Oman
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Thu 10 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 5th Match, First Round Group B – Scotland vs Zimbabwe
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Thu 10 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 6th Match, First Round Group B – Afghanistan vs Hong Kong
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Fri 11 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 7th Match, First Round Group A – Oman vs Netherlands
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Fri 11 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 8th Match, First Round Group A – Bangladesh vs Ireland
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Sat 12 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 9th Match, First Round Group B – Afghanistan vs Zimbabwe
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Sat 12 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 10th Match, First Round Group B – Hong Kong vs Scotland
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Sun 13 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 11th Match, First Round Group A – Ireland vs Netherlands
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Sun 13 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 12th Match, First Round Group A – Bangladesh vs Oman
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Tue 15 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 13th Match, Super 10 Group 2 – India vs New Zealand
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Wed 16 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 14th Match, Super 10 Group 2 – Pakistan vs Qualifer Group A
Eden Gardens, Kolkata
Wed 16 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 15th Match, Super 10 Group 1 – England vs West Indies
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
Thu 17 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 16th match, Super 10 Group 1 – Sri Lanka vs Qualifier Group B
Eden Gardens, Kolkata
Fri 18 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 17th match, Super 10 Group 2 – Australia vs New Zealand
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Fri 18 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 18th match, Super 10 Group 1 – England vs South Africa
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
Sat 19 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 19th match, Super 10 Group 2 – India vs Pakistan
Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association Stadium, Dharamsala
Sun 20 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 20th match, Group 1 – South Africa vs Qualifier Group B
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
Sun 20 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 21st match, Super 10 Group 1 – Sri Lanka vs West Indies
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
Mon 21 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 22nd match, Super 10 Group 2 – Australia vs Qualifier Group A
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
Tue 22 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 23rd match, Super 10 Group 2 – New Zealand vs Pakistan
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Chandigarh
Wed 23 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 24th match, Super 10 Group 1 – England vs Qualifier Group B
Feroz Shah Kotla, New Delhi
Wed 23 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 25th match, Super 10 Group 2 – India vs Qualifier Group A
M. Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
Fri 25 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 26th match, Super 10 Group 2 – Australia vs Pakistan
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Chandigarh
Fri 25 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 27th match, Super 10 Group 1 – South Africa vs West Indies
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Sat 26 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 28th match, Super 10 Group 2 – New Zealand vs Qualifier Group A
Eden Gardens, Kolkata
Sat 26 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 29th match, Super 10 Group 1 – England vs Sri Lanka
Feroz Shah Kotla, New Delhi
Sun 27 D/N
09:30 GMT, 15:00 local 30th match, Super 10 Group 1 – West Indies vs Qualifier Group B
Vidarbha Cricket Association Stadium, Nagpur
Sun 27 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 31st match, Super 10 Group 2 – India vs Australia
Punjab Cricket Association Stadium, Chandigarh
Mon 28 D/N
14:00 GMT, 19:30 local 32nd match, Super 10 Group 1 – South Africa vs Sri Lanka
Feroz Shah Kotla, New Delhi
Wed 30 D/N
13:30 GMT, 19:00 local 1st semi-final – TBC vs TBC (Runner Group 1 v Winner Group 2)
Feroz Shah Kotla, New Delhi
Thu 31 D/N
13:30 GMT, 19:00 local 2nd semi-final – TBC vs TBC (Winner Group 1 v Runner Group 2)
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
Apr-2016
Sun 03 D/N
13:30 GMT, 19:00 local Final – TBC vs TBC (Reserve Day)
Eden Gardens, Kolkata

Solar Eclipse


In India partial solar eclipse will be seen at sunrise on 9th March. The same will be visible from most places of India except from North West and western parts of the country.

the partial phase of the eclipse begins before sunrise. However, start of partial phase of the eclipse will take place just after sunrise from extreme north east India.

As one moves towards the east of the country, the duration of the partial eclipse increases reaching upto a duration of about one hour and more in extreme north east India and in Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

Considering the Earth as a whole the partial phase of the eclipse will begin at 4 h 49 m IST. The total phase will begin at 5 h 47 m IST. The total phase will end at 9 h 08m IST. The partial phase will end at 10h 05m IST.

In India obscuration of the Sun by the Moon at the time of greatest phase of partial eclipse will be around 15 percent in Agartala, 24.5 percent in Bhubaneswar, 11 percent in Guwahati, 18.5 percent in Kolkata, 12 percent in Patna, 49 percent in Port Blair, 12 percent in Silchar etc.

The total eclipse of the Sun would be visible within a narrow corridor in the northern Hemisphere. The totality path would pass through Sumatra, Borneo, Indonesia and the North Pacific Ocean.

Eclipsed Sun should not be viewed with the naked eye, even for a very short time. It will cause permanent damage of the eyes leading to blindness even when the moon covers most portion of the Sun.

Safe technique to observe the solar eclipse is either by using proper filter like aluminized Mylar, black polymer, welding glass of shade number 14 or by making projection of Sun’s image on a white board by telescope.

A total eclipse of the Sun will occur on March 9, 2016
Last Updated : 02 Mar 2016 03:47:26 PM IST http://www.facebook.com/plugins/like.php?href=http://saharasamay.com/technology-news/676586013/dont-miss-total-solar-eclipse-after-shivratri.html&send=false&layout=button_count&show_faces=false&action=like&colorscheme=light&font
A total eclipse of the Sun will occur on March 9, 2016
(file photo)

 

In India it will be seen as partial solar eclipse at sunrise. The same will be visible from most places of India except from North West and westernparts of the country.

the partial phase of the eclipse begins before sunrise. However, start of partial phase of the eclipse will take place just after sunrise from extreme north east India.

As one moves towards the east of the country, the duration of the partial eclipse increases reaching upto a duration of about one hour and more in extreme north east India and in Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

Considering the Earth as a whole the partial phase of the eclipse will begin at 4 h 49 m IST. The total phase will begin at 5 h 47 m IST. The total phase will end at 9 h 08m IST. The partial phase will end at 10h 05m IST.

In India obscuration of the Sun by the Moon at the time of greatest phase of partial eclipse will be around 15 percent in Agartala, 24.5 percent in Bhubaneswar, 11 percent in Guwahati, 18.5 percent in Kolkata, 12 percent in Patna, 49 percent in Port Blair, 12 percent in Silchar etc.

The total eclipse of the Sun would be visible within a narrow corridor in the northern Hemisphere. The totality path would passe through Sumatra, Borneo, Indonesia and the North Pacific Ocean.

Eclipsed Sun should not be viewed with the naked eye, even for a very short time. It will cause permanent damage of the eyes leading to blindness even when the moon covers most portion of the Sun.

Safe technique to observe the solar eclipse is either by using proper filter like aluminized Mylar, black polymer, welding glass of shade number 14 or by making projection of Sun’s image on a white board by telescope.

scholarship test for gate coaching

Admission cum Scholarship Test for GATE Coaching


gate 2017 scholarship test, scholarship test for gate coaching

For GATE 2017 Aspirants, Scholarship Test

scholarship test for gate 2017

GATE 2017 Scholarship Test

 

THE GATE COACH is organizing a scholarship test On 6th march, 2016. THE GATE COACH will provide scholarship worth Rs. 1.65 crores for those students who wish to enrol in classroom courses for IES, GATE 2017 and PSUs.
This is for those talented engineering graduates who prepares for prominent engineering service examination, public sectors, IITs etc. But due to adverse economic conditions, these students are unable to take coaching guidance; therefore THE GATE COACH has taken an initiative to acknowledge the talented students in the form of scholarships.
THE GATE COACH has decided to offer scholarships to those students, who are good in their Academics. Besides, also for those students who maintains uniformity in their regular studies.
Details of Test
· Fee for the Test- NIL

· Date of Test- 6th March 2016

· Eligibility – third year and final year B Tech students

· Syllabus- General Aptitude and Engineering mathematics

For Registration Click here…….

Call us at – 9873452122 or email at- delhi.tgc@gmail.com
Visit us at – www.thegatecoach.institute
Like us at- https://www.facebook.com/TheGateCoach
Our address is- The Gate Coach, 28, Jia Sarai, Near IIT, New Delhi -16